iBIBLE maps

Israel Archaeology

Israel Archaeology

Haaretz article

The Land of Israel has been a playground for archeologists seeking to uncover ancient ruins and artifacts since the mid-nineteenth century.

Israel’s archaeological digs mostly center on the excavation of sites mentioned in the Bible. Since the beginning of the twentieth century, remains of ancient settlements have also been excavated.

Archeology in the region expanded during the British Mandate period (1917 – 1948) and has increased with the founding of the modern state of Israel.

One of the most important discoveries has been that of the Dead Sea Scrolls, between 1947–1956, in caves in Qumran, near Jericho, which revealed some of the earliest copies of the books of the Bible.

Israel hosts a number of important Biblical and historic sites. Archeological digs have uncovered remains from the biblical cities of Hatzor, Megiddo, Be’er Sheva, Tiberias, Masada, and Herodian.

Archeological research in Israel has been used as an important tool to build up the modern state and has helped establish historical links between the Jewish people, the Bible and land of Israel.
Archeology in Israel involves the systematic investigation of all remains from the country’s past, from the prehistoric era to the end of Ottoman rule in Palestine.

Since Israel was historically situated at the crossroads between Africa and the East, and served as a land bridge between the prosperous cultures of the Fertile Crescent (now Iraq) and Egypt, archeological artifacts from some of history’s most important civilizations and developments have been found in the region.

In all, there are over 20,000 recognized antiquities sites in Israel, and the Israel Antiquities Authority is charged with ensuring the protection of these sites and in issuing licenses for the excavation.”

Read more

Articles from Biblical Archaeology Society

Artifacts from the First Temple period are extremely rare

Artifacts from the First Temple period are extremely rare

Another First Temple Weight, This One With Mirror Writing, Found in Jerusalem Sifting Project. This tiny stone weight found by the foundation stones of the Western Wall may have been used in the First Temple itself, if users were unfazed by its backwards...

read more
The “High Place” at Tel Gezer

The “High Place” at Tel Gezer

Tel Gezer’s first excavator, R.A.S. Macalister, believed these ten monumental standing stones were part of a Middle Bronze Age Canaanite “high place” dedicated to child sacrifice. This photo was taken during the re-excavation of Gezer in the 1960s and...

read more
The “Philistines” to the North

The “Philistines” to the North

Reliefs at the Temple of Ramesses III at Medinet Habu depict the Egyptians in battle with three tribes of Sea Peoples: the Danunu, the Sikils and the Philistines. Bible and archaeology news Biblical Archaeology Society The Philistines in the Bible and the...

read more
6,500-Year-Old DNA Points to Ancient Migration

6,500-Year-Old DNA Points to Ancient Migration

These burial urns (ossuaries) from Peqi’in Cave in Israel are evidence of ancient migration in the Levant, researchers say. Scale bar: 10 cm. Photo Mariana Salzberger, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority. Bible and archaeology news Robin Ngo,...

read more
Daily Life in Ancient Israel

Daily Life in Ancient Israel

According to author Robert D. Miller, archaeological surveys and excavations of the central hill country have provided a much clearer picture of daily life in ancient Israel during the time of the Biblical Judges and the early Israelite settlers of Canaan....

read more
Philistine Cemetery Unearthed at Ashkelon

Philistine Cemetery Unearthed at Ashkelon

Skull from a Philistine burial from Ashkelon’s cemetery dated to the 10th–9th century B.C.E Bible and archaeology news Biblical Archaeology Society Discovery brings us face to face with the Israelites’ archenemy Extracted from – Megan Sauter, 06/17/2018...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This